News by Category

Amalia Hornung

Playing well with machines

The University of Minnesota is preparing students for careers of the future—like in robotics and 3D printing.
https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/playing-well-machines
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
05/16/2019
Three female students, one in the low-built formula racing car, all with ponytails, confer

The female formula

The student formula car team motors to success with women in the driver’s seat.
https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/female-formula
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
04/08/2019
The robot, about two feet tall, has just tossed up a ball on the floor of a U of M gym.

Battle of the bots

Students’ basketball-playing robot competes in a collegiate “final four.”
https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/battle-bots
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
03/29/2019
Rachel Anderson, white, with almost no hair (due to alopecia), sits next to a poster for She is ME.

She is ME

An engineering student supports her peers while finding her own niche.
https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/she-me
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
01/15/2019
Mrubank Bhatt and two other grad students discuss matters.

More to bubbles than you think

The improbable power of bubbles fascinates grad student Mrugank Bhatt.
https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/more-bubbles-you-think
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
01/11/2019
A red, walnut-sized 3D prostate sits in a gloved hand

The New Shape of Medicine: how 3D printing may save lives

Michael McAlpine and his colleagues are building organ models to help surgeons prepare for surgery. They also have made a device to treat spinal cord injuries and taken a first step toward a bionic eye. Photo: A 3-D printed prostate model
https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/new-shape-medicine-how-3d-printing-may-save-lives
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
09/27/2018

Pages