UMN Expert: Viewing solar eclipse with naked eye is dangerous

August 18, 2017
Dr. Joshua Hou

Joshua Hou, MD, is a University of Minnesota Health ophthalmologist and assistant professor at the University of Minnesota, Medical School. 

How dangerous is it to look at a solar eclipse with the naked eye? According to UMN expert Dr. Joshua Hou, it’s equally as dangerous to look at a solar eclipse as it is to look at the sun. 

 “The high intensity of the sun's light can damage the retina and even kill some of its cells,” said Dr. Hou.

 While there is no written record of people going blind from looking at the sun, there is proof that it can cause a lot of other issues such as distorted vision, a temporary blind spot, or issues seeing colors.

 Dr. Hou advises if you do want to look at an eclipse, make sure you wear proper protective glasses. Hou says those glasses only let in .003 percent of light as opposed to regular glasses, which let in 1,000 times more than that.  

Dr. Joshua Hou
University of Minnesota Health ophthalmologist and assistant professor at the University of Minnesota, Medical School.
UMN Medical School

Contact information:
jhhou@umn.edu or 757-642-2117 (cell) 

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Image iconDr Joshua Hou.jpg

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